A Golden Eagle wheels low looking for an easy meal at a banding station - Photo by Mike Werner  

Home

 

About Us

 

History

 

Directions

 

Events

 

Migration #'s

 

Photo Gallery

 

Bird Links

 

Sponsors

 

Hawkwatching

 

Education

 

Species Info

 

Latest News

 

Membership

 

Contact Us

 
   
   

HAWK CLIFF FOUNDATION

Hawkwatching

Education

Species Info

Migration #'s

Latest News


Prev Species   Next Species

Northern Goshawk
(Accipiter gentilis)

Migration Timeframe:

Although the first few Goshawks are spotted migrating in September, they really start to move in early October. Their numbers peak from mid to late October with migration continuing through November. A few leave in December, and some as late as January.



Year

Peak Week

Avg

2002-2007 Oct 20-26 12


Year

Peak Week

Count

2008 Oct 27-Nov 02 15


Year

Earliest Obs

Count

Year

Latest Obs

Count

2002-2007 Sep 03 2005 2 2002-2007 Dec 01 2007 2
2008 Oct 05 5 2008 Nov 21 1

 

Where to Watch:

Like the other accipiters, the Goshawks tend to sneak past the hawkwatch along the tree lines. Their flight level is often lower compared to most of the other raptors although they can be seen soaring and kettling. The best views of Goshawks are usually right at "Sharpie Alley" (just south of the ravine) much like the Sharpies and Cooper's. They may also be see farther north (past the intersection at Dexter Line) and even along the large ridge at Fruit Ridge Rd.


High Counts:

There were no new records set for Goshawks in 2008.


1-Year 

Count

1-Month

Count

2004

68

Nov 2004

46


1-Day

Count

1-Hour

Count

Oct 11 1996

20 Oct 11 2007 5

 

Yearly Totals:

The 2008 yearly total for Northern Goshawks was barely half of the 10-Year average and well short of the 5-Year average. (averages are based on 1998-2007 and 2003-2007 counts).


Year

Count

Year

Count

Year

Count

1995 30 2000 17 2005 66
1996 35 2001 43 2006 52
1997 46 2002 19 2007 34
1998 7 2003 52 2008 23
1999 22 2004 68 2009 N/A


10-Yr Avg

5-Yr Avg

44

57



Interesting Facts:

  • Goshawks have a very large white eyebrow stripe that is often visible even in flight.

  • When soaring, their tail exhibits a wedge shape.

  • Goshawks are sexually dimorphic (though the least so of our accipiters) with marginal or no overlap.

  • Males are smaller than females but not always separable in the field.

  • Males have slightly finer barring on their undersides (body and wings) than females.

  • Adults may stay in or close to breeding territories except when prey is scarce (Snowshoe Hares and Ruffed Grouse).

  • In Ontario, adults usually winter in northern forests if prey is abundant. Juveniles usually depart natal regions.  Goshawks will migrate in any direction to wooden tracts of any age, wooded rural and urban locales, and sometimes to areas with marginal tree growth.

  • Southward movements are seldom to southern parts of the U.S., i.e. rarely seen in Florida

 

 

 


An adult Northern Goshawk takes a break on a nearby tree - Photo by Shay Redmond

Click on chart image for enlarged version

Click on chart image for enlarged version 

 

 


 

 

 

 

Created: 2007-04-27   2007 Hawk Cliff Foundation  -  All rights reserved